About Gardening

organic gardening vegetables

Gardening can be one of the most enjoyable and fruitful (no pun intended) activities. Whether you are looking to have a flower garden that will give you fresh cut flowers all season, or a vegetable garden to feed your family. The other and most important part of planning your garden is using the organic method. This is not only good for you and the environment, it is much better for your plants. You will also need to use organic methods for phoenix pest control.

In the Southwest you have different issues than most of the other parts of the country. Plant zones break down what grows best in the climate you live in. You will need to fence your garden in depending on what animals and rodents you have around and what you are planting. Just remember that snakes can climb, squirrels dig and climb, and armadillos love vegetable roots. Coyotes too like all those animals and could go hunting in your garden. Building a deep thin fencing around your garden can helps keep them out.

The soil in the Southwest is usually nutritionally ok but will require some organic compounds added to it. Organic steer and horse manure is a great organic amendment to your soil whether it’s sandy or clay like. The goal is for your plants to hold on and not be falling over in sandy soil, or get root rot in clay like soil. If you want healthy plants you need healthy soil. Healthy soil is filled with microbes, fungi, earthworms. Seeing earthworms in your soil is a good
sign that your doing things right.

garden planting A very important fact about adding animal manure to your garden is to do it at least 2 to 3 months before planting. You want the manure to sit and for any salt to leach into the ground and not fry your plants. You can also add some old straw to the mix and then after a 2-3 month wait, hand mix in or use a rototiller. When you add your plants or seeds the soil will be perfect. For organic gardening you will need to use organic plants, or organic seeds. Just know that regular seeds are treated with a fungicide that assists in germination, but that isn’t organic gardening.